Alumni Events Around the World

Exhibition / United States

DINH Q. LÊ: TRUE JOURNEY IS RETURN

September 14, 2018 - April 7, 2019

The largest solo exhibition in the United States in more than a decade of the work of internationally-renowned artist Dinh Q. Lê, this exhibition of five major video and photography installations entwines rarely heard narratives of war and migration from people in North Vietnam, the Vietnamese diaspora, and refugees who, like Lê, have returned to live in their home country. Assembling these obscure stories through the collection of found photographs, artists’ war sketches, and oral histories, Lê presents a multifaceted story about Vietnamese life before, during, and after the Vietnam War. In the process, he questions the viability of collective memory and reveals the effects of trauma on the cultural imagination.

ACC has provided support to the San Jose Museum of Art for this exhibition.

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Grantees: San Jose Museum of Art, Le Dinh Q.

Exhibition / United States
February 1, 2019 - March 29, 2019

Somnath Bhatt | Issam Kourbaj | Firoz Mahmud | Qinza Najm | Sahana Ramakrishnan | Sa’dia Rehman | Mohsin Shafi | Marcelino Stuhmer | Saira Wasim
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Curated by Atif Sheikh

“Take it like a ...”; contemporary trends in the aesthetics of violence takes a look at violence as methodology and/or aesthetics in contemporary art, and the exploration of its connection to similar aesthetics in ancient art.

The show, curated by Twelve Gates’ Atif Sheikh, brings together a group of artists whose work responds to and explores the many aspects of violence in contemporary society. By referencing the aesthetics of the past, each in their own way, the tradition of depicting violence in art becomes evident; as applied to contemporary issues, the aesthetics call into question the tradition itself. As we as a global society become increasingly aware of the destructive, divisive outcomes and less convinced by the narrative in favor of the necessity of engaging in conflict, the tradition of depicting violence in art reflects this almost traumatized, fragmented reckoning. The pieces seem to seek to slow down the process of conflict enough to understand it and perhaps choose a different conclusion.
Sheikh says, “Ancient art offers a valuable insight into ancient societies and their aesthetics of violence. This is especially the case in the classical and medieval representation of the ‘Other’ as either monstrous or feminine (e.g. the ancient Greek representation of the masculine hero in juxtaposition to the feminine Barbarian enemy). Whereas war was considered noble in ancient times, it still needed justification through the representation of the enemy in art. Today, as we live in a time of multiple, simultaneous wars, violence is similarly justified by painting the ‘enemy’ as vile in the media, thereby engendering a sense of righteousness.
By exploring the resonances between the ancient and the contemporary world, the aim of my project is to stir up conversations about issues that are otherwise complacently accepted.”

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Grantee: Firoz Mahmud

Performance / United States

Dress Up, Speak Up: Costume and Confrontation

March 19, 2018 - March 1, 2019

Dress Up, Speak Up is a multimedia exhibition exploring the role of costuming, iconography, and performance in constructing Identity and confronting history. With over 35 participating artists representing 22 nationalities, Dress Up, Speak Up delivers a global investigation of these concepts, while reconfiguring, reimagining, and reconstituting history to explore the legacy of European colonialism.

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Grantee: Le Dinh Q.

Exhibition / India

Window without a Wall

January 28, 2019 - February 28, 2019

An experiential installation by ASCC alumni Vanita Gupta in collaboration with Naveen Mahantash.

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Grantee: Vanita Gupta

United States

I Can't Sleep: Homage to a Uyghur Homeland

January 17, 2019 - February 23, 2019

Women and children – posturing, gazing, playing on bed frames – become “coincidental subjects,” their vivid garments sharply accentuated against the muted earth tones of the vast Taklamakan Desert. This far west region of China (Xinjiang), home to the Uyghur people, is a place Lisa Ross has imaged and imagined for over 15 years. Recently, the Chinese state has amplified its efforts to forcibly assimilate minority populations, imbuing the artist with a sense of urgency to display these pictures.

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Grantee: Lisa Ross